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To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of paired group leadership of a group psychosocial intervention aiming to represent both formal and informal health systems, and of traditional midwives acting as delivery-agents. The systemic neglect of the role of traditional culture in health has been described as the single biggest barrier to advancement of the highest attainable standard of health worldwide, especially among marginalized groups . In Guatemala, relations between formal and traditional providers are often tense due to differing approaches to health, a long history of discrimination and devaluation of indigenous knowledge and practices . The overwhelming recourse to comadronas by indigenous women testifies to local cultural norms and preferences and greater trust in traditional practices .

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The next hearing in the trial is set for late April, but a bill making its way through Congress is putting the case in jeopardy. The legal initiative would grant broad amnesty to perpetrators of crimes against humanity during the 36-year civil war.

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The funding body had no role in the design of the study, in data collection, analysis or interpretation, or in writing the manuscript. Perén HI. Revival of Maya medicine and impact for its social and political recognition . Several women mentioned that the Circles helped them improve their relationship with their children and other family members, because they learned to better manage their anger and to not make others feel bad by insulting or hitting them.

  • Most (95%) rural mothers self-described as Mam, and 74% periurban mothers as K’iche’.
  • We addressed this knowledge gap for a population at special disadvantage of maternal mental health disorders through the co-design of a culturally safe perinatal group psychosocial intervention compatible with indigenous traditions – Women’s Circles.
  • The violence committed against Sepur Zarco’s women and their families seems to have been a response to their attempts to settle on and get title to the land, particularly in the late 1970s.

“He knew what he was doing. He isolated me from my family and friends. I know what it is to live with violence from an early age,” she says. “Most of us have to live violence in silence so when someone hits us or screams at us we just close our eyes and let go. We have to join other women and talk about it so we know this is not OK, this is not normal.” “We are being killed by our fathers, brothers, stepfathers… the very people who are supposed to care for us,” says Rebeca Lane, a feminist rapper in Guatemala City. In my work in Southwestern Colorado with immigrants Guatemala ladies from Guatemala, most immigrants I worked with who migrated alone were, like Marvin, male and motivated to migrate because of poverty. Migrating to the United States is, for many young men, a rite of passage in Guatemala, a journey imbued with cultural merit stretching beyond mere economics. One 17-year-old immigrant from Totonicapán shared with me that it wasn’t even his decision to come to the United States. His father sat him down one day and bluntly told him it was time—it was his turn to travel to the United States and do as his father had done.

However, like many societies and supply chains across the world, women’s economic and social inequalities are often reproduced rather than transformed by coffee cultivation. This means smallholder coffee farmers owned or operated by women are less likely than their male counterparts to have access to or control over land, financing, markets, and agricultural information and technology. That is why in 2018, the UTZ program, Lidl, and CARE partnered together on a two-year initiative called ‘Project Guatemala’.

The artist uses flat areas of color and simple forms influenced by Cubist art he studied in Europe. Mérida hoped to develop a new audience and an appreciation for his native culture through such modern images. Virginia’s attacker was paroled early and returned to Virginia’s village, where he and his family continued to threaten Virginia and her family, even spreading rumors that he would rape Virginia’s sisters. Virginia’s father estimated it would take the police at least an hour to arrive if he called them. He added that they were reluctant to do so because the police could easily be bribed, they were afraid of angering the man, and their previous legal experience had been so tiresome and expensive.

Founded in 1965, LARR publishes articles in the humanities and social sciences, covering the fields of anthropology, economics, history, literature and cultural studies, political science, and sociology. It is the official scholarly journal of the Latin American Studies Association . More than a decade later, a UN-sponsored report said this abuse had been generalised and systematic – it estimated that 25% or 50,000 of the victims of Guatemala’s war were women.

Campaigning lawyer Almudena Bernabeu, of the US-based Center of Justice and Accountability, says rape, mutilation, sexual slavery and the killing of foetuses were all part of a plan to eliminate the Mayan people. “Gender violence has been used as a weapon to eliminate ethnic groups, and that’s genocide,” she says. The army and the members of the paramilitary “civil self-defence patrols” tortured the women they didn’t kill in order to stigmatise them. Teresa tells how days after she was raped, she was forcibly taken to a military barracks, raped for 15 days by countless soldiers and given bulls’ blood and raw meat to eat. With the support of the UN Peace Building Fund, UN Women is leading efforts to implement the transformative sentence delivered in the Sepur Zarco case, working in partnership with national authorities, international women’s organizations, Guatemalan civil society and other UN agencies. In Guatemala, there is growing support for policies that promote equitable gender-based access to political power, education, and the ownership of land. Other proportional representation democracies in Latin America have codified women’s political representation by passing legislation mandating that parties include a minimum percentage of female candidates on their ballots.

USAID fosters greater social inclusion in political processes in Guatemala by strengthening the civic and political participation of women so that they have a more prominent voice in decision-making, improved access to public services, and equal access to economic opportunities. While Spain may be unable to extradite the accused, international arrest warrants at least prevent them leaving Guatemala.